Terminal Services - Frequently Asked Windows Terminal Services Questions!

[12] Frequently Asked Asp Questions!
Updated: Jun 07, 2000
[188] Frequently Asked Citrix Questions!
Updated: Oct 10, 2006
[3] Frequently Asked Sco Tarentella Questions!
Updated: Aug 16, 2002
[260] Frequently Asked Windows Terminal Services Questions!
Updated: Aug 03, 2006
1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
How do I allow a user to reset their own Terminal Server or Citrix ICA Session? 

Thanks to Ken Lutz for his compilation and leg work on this one:

I got this working.  If anyone is interested here is the solution that I came up with.

1) set the HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Citrix
        IcaEnableKeepAlive  - Reg_Dword to 1
        ICAKeepAliveInterval - Reg_Dword to 1800 (30 minutes)  (I have my disconnected user reset
time set to 60 minutes)
This setting means that a users session will get reset after just over 1.5 hours, if they do nothing.

2) I got a copy of the FINDUSER.exe utility from this web site:  http://www.wizbang.org.uk 
(it`s part of the Command line tools download).

3) I also had to get the choice.exe utility from the NT Resource kit.

4) I then published this script:

<~~~~ Start of Script - watch for word wrap ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~>
@Echo off
cls
@ECHO ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@ECHO ~ Use this procedure to reset all your active Citrix sessions.         ~
@ECHO ~                                                                      ~
@echo ~ By resetting active Citrix sessions you may risk the lose of data!!  ~
@echo ~                                                                      ~
@echo ~ Are you sure you want to reset your active Citrix sessions?          ~
@Echo ~ Respond with Y for yes and N for no (upper case Y or N only).        ~
@echo ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Choice /C:YN /S Proceed with Citrix session reset?
If errorlevel 2 goto :END1                                         

   if exist H:\resetlist.txt del H:\resetlist.txt

   %WINDIR%\FindUser.exe %UserName% /server:%WINDIR%\serverlist.txt >H:\ResetList.txt

   for /f "skip=5 tokens=1,4" %%I in (H:\ResetList.txt) do   (set rserver=%%I& set rsess=%%J& call :DOIT)

goto :END2


:DOIT
    @ECHO %SESSIONNAME% %RSESS%
    IF RSESS == SESSIONNAME GOTO :EOF
    @ECHO RESET SESSION %RSESS% /SERVER:%RSERVER%
    RESET SESSION %RSESS% /SERVER:%RSERVER%



goto :EOF






:END1
@ECHO ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@ECHO ~ You chose NOT to reset any Citrix sessions at this time.             ~
@ECHO ~ No Citrix sessions have been reset!                                  ~
@ECHO ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
pause


:END2
@ECHO ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@ECHO ~                                                                      ~
@echo ~ Please wait until you get the "Saving your settings" message before  ~
@echo ~ you open any other Citrix session.  (Don`t click on another NFuse    ~
@echo ~ icon until after you see the "Saving your settings" message.)        ~
@ECHO ~                                                                      ~
@echo ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
pause
<~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~End of Script~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~>

The only thing with this is that it will not reset the session if it is already disconnected. 
It will only reset active sessions.  It will not reset the session that is running the script
(the current active session).

The reason I had to write this is because I have some users that would loose their connection to Citrix
(via NFuse and published applications) yet leave their sessions active to Citrix. 
The only way I could recreate this is to reboot the PC while the Citrix session is active.

How many connections can I have to a Windows 2003 Terminal Services in Remote Administration mode? 

Most people think the answer to this question is 2. However you can have 3 connections to a Windows 2003 Termianl server in Remote Administration mode. Windows 2003 adds the ability to RDP directly to the console. Microsoft slipped up and you can now have 2 remote connections and a third direct connection right to the console.

How do I hide the My Computer Icon in Windows NT or Windows 2000? 

Credit Jeff Durbin with this one:

There is no such setting (that I`ve found) in Win2K Group Policy.
You can add the setting yourself by importing a template into your policy:
 - Paste the following into notepad:

CLASS USER


  CATEGORY "Custom Settings"


    POLICY "Remove My Computer from Desktop"
      KEYNAME "Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\NonEnum"
      VALUENAME "{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}"
      VALUEON  NUMERIC 1
      VALUEOFF NUMERIC 0
    END POLICY

  END CATEGORY ; Custom Settings

- Save the file with the extension ADM (redfish.adm, for example).
- For Win2K AD, open your policy and import the template
- For NT4 policy, just add the template to the policy.

How do I get rid of the dialog "Some files can be harmful... Would you like to open the file or save..." When I click on a link in Internet Explorer 6 SP1? Specifically I want to get rid of it for .DOC .PDF and .XLS. 

1. Double-click My Computer, and then click Folder Options on the Tools menu.

2. Click the File Types tab, click a specific file type (for example, Microsoft Excel Worksheet) in the
   Registered file types box, and then click Advanced.

3. Click to clear the Confirm open after download check box, and then click OK.

4. Repeat the above procedure for each file type you don`t want the dialog to appear.

Note: If you want to do this for all users on the machine go to a command
prompt and type: change user /install prior to the changes. After you are done
changing settings type: change user /execute  from the command prompt.

How to I install Terminal Services on Windows Server 2003? 
This comes from Microsoft Product Documentation at:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/proddocs/entserver/terminal_server_role.asp

Terminal server role: Configuring a terminal server

Configure this computer as a terminal server by installing the Terminal Server component, which provides centralized deployment of applications.

Using a terminal server, users in remote locations can run programs, save files, and use network resources as though those resources were installed on the users` own computers. By installing programs on a terminal server, you can ensure that all users are using the same version of a program. If you plan to use this computer to allow multiple users to access a program at the same time from a single point of installation, configure this computer as a terminal server.

However, if you plan to use this computer for remote administration on Windows Server 2003 operating systems, you do not need to install Terminal Server. Instead, you can use Remote Desktop for Administration (formerly Terminal Services in Remote Administration mode), which is installed by default on computers running one of the Windows Server 2003 operating systems. After you enable remote connections, Remote Desktop for Administration allows you to remotely manage servers from any client over a LAN, WAN, or dial-up connection. Up to two remote sessions, plus the console session, can be accessed at the same time, without requiring Terminal Server Licensing. For more information about Remote Desktop for Administration, see Remote Administration using Terminal Services.

This topic explains how to use the Configure Your Server Wizard to install and configure a terminal server. After you have completed the Configure Your Server Wizard, you must perform the following additional steps in order to have a basic terminal server.

  • Confirm Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration settings.
  • Configure a Terminal Server License Server on another server.

    Important

    • This step is required. If you do not install Terminal Server Licensing, your terminal server will stop accepting connections from unlicensed clients when the evaluation period ends, 120 days after the first client logon.
  • Install client access licenses (CALs) on the Terminal Server License Server.
  • Install programs on the terminal server.
  • Distribute the latest version of Remote Desktop Connection to clients running earlier versions of Remote Desktop Connection for Windows.
  • Specify which users have permission to connect to the terminal server.

After you have completed both the Configure Your Server Wizard and these additional required tasks, you will have a basic terminal server.

This topic covers:

Before you begin

Configuring your terminal server

Next steps: Completing additional tasks


Before you begin

Before you configure your computer as a terminal server, verify whether or not:

  • The operating system is configured correctly. In the Windows Server 2003 family, a terminal server depends on the appropriate configuration of the operating system and its services. If you have a new installation of a Windows Server 2003 operating system, you can use the default service settings. No further action is necessary. If you upgraded to a Windows Server 2003 operating system or you want to confirm that your services are configured correctly for best performance and security, verify your service settings with the table in Default settings for services.
  • The computer is a server on a network or in a domain, but is not a domain controller
    domain controller
    In an Active Directory forest, a server that contains a writable copy of the Active Directory database, participates in Active Directory replication, and controls access to network resources. Administrators can manage user accounts, network access, shared resources, site topology, and other directory objects from any domain controller in the forest.
    . Installing Terminal Server on a domain controller affects performance because of the additional memory, network traffic, and processor time required to perform the tasks of a domain controller in a domain.
  • The computer meets processor and memory requirements for supporting multiple concurrent sessions where different users are logged on. A terminal server requires a minimum of 128 MB RAM, plus additional RAM for each user to support running each user`s programs on the server. An additional 10 MB RAM is recommended for each light user, who typically runs one program at a time, and up to 21 MB RAM for each power user, who typically runs three or more programs at the same time. In addition, if you plan to install 16-bit applications on the terminal server, be aware that they consume additional resources when they run in 32-bit environments such as Windows Server 2003 operating systems.
  • There are no programs installed on the computer. You should add the Terminal Server role before you install the programs that you want users to access. If there are programs already installed on the computer, you might have to reinstall them to ensure that they work correctly in the Terminal Server environment.
  • No users are able to log on remotely to the computer. You should allow users to access the terminal server only after you have installed programs, tested their installation, and performed any tuning necessary for the programs to work in a multisession environment. For information on disabling terminal services connections temporarily, see To disable Terminal Services connections.
  • All existing disk volumes use the NTFS file system
    NTFS file system
    An advanced file system that provides performance, security, reliability, and advanced features that are not found in any version of file allocation table (FAT). For example, NTFS guarantees volume consistency by using standard transaction logging and recovery techniques. If a system fails, NTFS uses its log file and checkpoint information to restore the consistency of the file system. NTFS also provides advanced features, such as file and folder permissions, encryption, disk quotas, and compression.
    . FAT32
    FAT32
    A derivative of the file allocation table (FAT) file system. FAT32 supports smaller cluster sizes and larger volumes than FAT, which results in more efficient space allocation on FAT32 volumes.
    volumes do not provide either the required level of security for users in a multisession environment or the ability to set file permissions.

Configuring your terminal server

To configure a terminal server, start the Configure Your Server Wizard by doing either of the following:

  • From Manage Your Server, click Add or remove a role. By default, Manage Your Server starts automatically when you log on. To open Manage Your Server, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Manage Your Server.
  • To open the Configure Your Server Wizard, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Configure Your Server Wizard.

On the Server Role page, click Terminal server, and then click Next.

This section covers:

Summary of Selections

Completing the Configure Your Server Wizard

Confirm Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration Settings

Configuring a Terminal Server License Server

Installing client access licenses on the Terminal Server License Server

Installing programs on the terminal server

Deploying client software

Giving users permission to access the terminal server

Removing the terminal server role

Summary of Selections

On the Summary of Selections page, view and confirm the options that you have selected. If you selected Terminal server on the Server Role page, the following appears:

  • Install Terminal Server

To apply the selections shown on the Summary of Selections page, click Next. The following message appears: "During this process, the Configure Your Server Wizard restarts your computer. Before continuing, close any open programs." If you need to close open programs and you want to cancel the configuration of the terminal server role at this time, you must click Cancel now. When you click Cancel, the Configure Your Server Wizard displays the Cannot Complete page. To close the Configure Your Server Wizard, click Finish. Otherwise, if you click OK, the Configure Your Server Wizard begins the configuration process.

Next, the Configure Your Server Wizard displays the message "Installing Terminal Server." The Configuring Components page of the Windows Components Wizard appears, and then closes automatically. You cannot click Back or Next on this page. Then, the Configure Your Server Wizard shuts down the computer and restarts it to accept the configuration changes that make the computer a terminal server.

During the restart process, a dialog box displays progress messages, for example, "Windows is starting up" and "Preparing network connections." Depending on the size of your network, preparing network connections could take some time. When the Welcome to Windows dialog box appears, press CTRL+ALT+DEL. In the Log on to Windows dialog box, in Password, type your password. To complete the process, wait for the Configure Your Server Wizard to appear on the screen.

Completing the Configure Your Server Wizard

After your server restarts, the Configure Your Server Wizard displays the This Server is Now a Terminal Server page. To review all of the changes made to your server by the Configure Your Server Wizard or to ensure that a new role was installed successfully, click Configure Your Server log. The Configure Your Server Wizard log is located at systemroot\Debug\Configure Your Server.log. To close the Configure Your Server Wizard, click Finish.

Next, you must complete the following steps so that your server is ready to function as a basic terminal server:

  • Confirm Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration settings.
  • Configure a Terminal Server License Server.
  • Install client access licenses (CALs) on the Terminal Server License Server.
  • Install programs on the terminal server.
  • Deploy the Remote Desktop Connection .msi file to clients not running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 operating systems.
  • Give users permission to access the terminal server.

A separate window displays checklists that provide information about these additional requirements. The same information is covered in this document.

To run a terminal server, you need another computer that is configured to function as a Terminal Server License Server. If a Terminal Server License Server is already installed, you can skip the steps for configuring a Terminal Server License Server and installing CALs, and begin Installing programs on the terminal server. Otherwise, if the Manage Your Server page displays a message indicating that a Terminal Server License Server was not found, you must configure a Terminal Server License Server before you can use your terminal server.

Confirming Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration settings

After you complete the Configure Your Server Wizard and install Terminal Server, you can configure Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration settings.

If you activate these settings, Internet Explorer applies the following security settings to a user who logs on as an administrator:

  • High security settings to the Internet and Local intranet security zones
  • Medium security settings to the Trusted sites zone

By applying high security settings to the Internet and Local intranet security zones, you disable scripts, Microsoft ActiveX® controls, and the Microsoft virtual machine (Microsoft VM) for HTML content in these zones. You also prevent users from downloading files in these zones.

By applying medium security settings to the Trusted sites zone, you set standard browsing functionality. If you use sites for administrative tasks and Web-based applications that an administrator cannot access after you apply these settings, you can add the site addresses to the list of sites in the Trusted sites zone.

To review or change the Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration settings, in Manage Your Server, click Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration.

In the Windows Server 2003 family, you can implement enhanced security settings for Internet Explorer for all users and reduce the exposure of your server to Web sites that might pose a security risk. For more information, see Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration.

Configuring a Terminal Server License Server

Configure a Terminal Server License Server on a computer other than the one on which you have just configured the terminal server role. A Terminal Server License Server manages licenses for Terminal Services client connections. You are required to activate a Terminal Server License Server only once, after which the Terminal Server License Server becomes the repository for terminal server client licenses. Until the registration process is completed, your Terminal Server License Server can issue temporary licenses for clients.

Important

  • This step is required. If you do not configure a Terminal Server License Server, your terminal server will stop accepting connections from unlicensed clients at the end of the evaluation period, which is 120 days from the date of the first client logon.

The easiest and quickest way to activate a Terminal Server License Server is by using the Automatic method. To use this method, the computer running the Terminal Services Licensing service must have a direct connection to the Internet. For information on activation methods for computers that are not connected to the Internet, see To activate a Terminal Server License Server by using a Web browser and To activate a Terminal Server License Server by using the telephone.

The following table shows the steps you must take to configure and activate a Terminal Server License Server by using the Automatic method.

Task Comments
Install the Terminal Server Licensing service. Open Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components. In the Windows Components Wizard, select the Terminal Server Licensing check box, and then click Next. If your network includes several domains, or if you are installing the Terminal Server Licensing service on a member server, choose Your entire enterprise. If you want to maintain a separate Terminal Server License Server for each domain, or if your network includes workgroups or Windows NT 4.0 domains, choose Your domain or workgroup. If you want to change the location of the license server database, specify a new location, and then click Next. The Configuring Components page displays the progress of configuration changes. On the Completing the Windows Components Wizard page, click Finish, and then click Close.

Note

  • To open Add or Remove Programs, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
Activate the Terminal Server License Server. Open Terminal Server Licensing, right-click the Terminal Server License Server you want to activate, and click Activate Server. The Terminal Server License Server Activation Wizard starts. On the Connection method page, under Activation method, click Automatic connection, and then click Next. On the Company Information page, provide the following required information:
  • First name
  • Last name
  • Company name
  • Country or region
Confirm that the information you typed is correct, and then click Next. On the next Company Information page, you can provide the following optional information:
  • Email address
  • Organizational unit
  • Company address
  • City
  • State or province
  • Postal code
Confirm that the information you typed is correct, and then click Next. On the Completing the Terminal Server License Server Activation Wizard page, under Status, the following message appears: "Your license server has been successfully activated." If you want to install client licenses now, click Next. If you want to postpone the installation of client licenses, clear the Start Terminal Server Client Licensing Wizard now check box, and then click Finish.

Note

  • To open Terminal Server Licensing, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Terminal Server Licensing.

Installing client access licenses on the Terminal Server License Server

After you activate a Terminal Server License Server, the next step is to install client access licenses (CALs) on the Terminal Server License Server.

Important

  • Your Terminal Server License Server can issue temporary licenses that allow clients to use a terminal server for the duration of the evaluation period, which is 120 days from the first client logon. If you do not install CALs on your Terminal Server License Server, unlicensed clients will not be able to connect to your terminal server after the evaluation period has passed.

CALs are digitally-signed certificates that each client stores locally. All CALs are installed on a Terminal Server License Server. When a client logs on to a terminal server for the first time, the terminal server recognizes that the client has not been issued a CAL and locates a Terminal Server License Server to issue a new CAL to the client. For information about specific license requirements, see the Microsoft Web Site.

Before you install CALs, you must have your licensing agreement numbers ready, and know which method you used to purchase them.

The easiest and quickest way to install CALs on a Terminal Server License Server is by using the Automatic method. To use this method, the computer running the Terminal Services Licensing service must have a direct connection to the Internet. For information on installing CALs for computers that are not connected to the Internet, see To install client license key packs by using a Web browser and To install client license key packs by using the telephone.

The following table shows the steps you must take to install CALs on a Terminal Server License Server by using the Automatic method.

Task

Comments

Install CALs on the Terminal Server License Server.

On the Terminal Server License Server, open Terminal Server Licensing. Verify that the installation method for the Terminal Server License Server is set to Automatic by right-clicking the Terminal Server License Server for which you want to install CALs, and then clicking Properties. If necessary, on the Installation Method tab, change the installation method to Automatic connection, and then click OK.

In the Terminal Server Licensing console tree, right-click the Terminal Server License Server on which you want to install CALs, click Install Licenses, and then click Next. The Terminal Server CAL Installation Wizard starts. On the Licensing program page, choose the license program under which you purchased your licenses, and then click Next. On the License Code page, type the license code for each license you have purchased, and then click Add after each entry. After you have typed all of the license codes, click Next. The Completing the Terminal Server CAL Installation Wizard page displays a message that the CALs were successfully installed. To close the wizard, click Finish.

Note

  • To open Terminal Server Licensing, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Terminal Server Licensing.

Installing programs on the terminal server

At this stage, you have accomplished the following tasks:

  • Completed the Configure Your Server Wizard and configured the terminal server role on your server.
  • Installed Terminal Server Licensing on another computer.
  • Activated the Terminal Server License Server.
  • Installed CALs on the Terminal Server License Server.

Now you are ready to install programs on the terminal server. Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel is the preferred method for program installation, and you should use this method whenever possible. This section describes how to use Add or Remove Programs to install programs on a terminal server.

There are other program installation methods, such as the change user command, Windows Installer packages (.msi files), and Group Policy Software Installation. For more information about the change user command, see To install a program by using the change user command. For more information about using Windows Installer, see Assigned and published programs. For more information about Group Policy, see Group Policy.

For improved performance and reduced network traffic, install programs on the local drive of the terminal server instead of on a file server. Ensure that you have enough space to install programs on NTFS file system

NTFS file system
An advanced file system that provides performance, security, reliability, and advanced features that are not found in any version of file allocation table (FAT). For example, NTFS guarantees volume consistency by using standard transaction logging and recovery techniques. If a system fails, NTFS uses its log file and checkpoint information to restore the consistency of the file system. NTFS also provides advanced features, such as file and folder permissions, encryption, disk quotas, and compression.
drives instead of on FAT32
FAT32
A derivative of the file allocation table (FAT) file system. FAT32 supports smaller cluster sizes and larger volumes than FAT, which results in more efficient space allocation on FAT32 volumes.
drives. NTFS drives allow you to set file permissions, which you cannot do on FAT32 drives.

If you are installing published programs, you must use another installation method, such as Group Policy Software Installation.

For performance and security reasons, you should use 32-bit programs whenever possible. Most 32-bit programs use the registry to read and write program settings and need to write only to specific registry values. Running 16-bit programs can reduce the number of users a processor supports by 40 percent and increase the memory required for each user by 50 percent. In addition, some 16-bit programs must be able to write to the directory where the program`s .ini file is stored.

RAM and CPU requirements increase approximately linearly with the number of sessions running. To reduce RAM and CPU requirements, consider restricting user or group access to certain program types, disabling unnecessary program features, or installing programs on separate terminal servers.

Some programs have known installation issues in a multisession environment. For information about programs that require installation scripts in order to work correctly in a multisession environment, see Optimizing Applications for Windows 2000 Terminal Services and Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition at the Microsoft Web site.

Application compatibility considerations

You should install programs from the console session of the terminal server. You can install programs from a remote console session, but this is not the preferred method for installing programs.

Some programs require an application compatibility script to be run after the program is installed. The scripts are stored in the systemroot\Application Compatibility Scripts\Install directory on the terminal server.

You should be aware of the implications of the security mode in which the terminal server operates. There are two security modes:

  • Full security provides the most secure environment for users connecting to a terminal server. To run in this mode, applications must be written to run in the security context of an ordinary user. For Windows Server 2003 operating systems and Windows 2000, full security is the default.
  • Relaxed security enables you to run programs that otherwise might not work at all in the more rigorous Full security mode. However, in Relaxed security mode (also known as Windows NT 4.0/Terminal Server Edition permissions compatibility mode), any user on the system can change files and registry settings in many places throughout the system, although others users` data files might not be visible. A malicious user could exploit this situation by replacing a known and trusted program with a program of the same name but some harmful intent. If the operating system on your terminal server was installed using the Upgrade method, the security mode might be set to Relaxed security. When in doubt, you should choose Full security, test your applications in that mode, and change the security mode only if your test results indicate the need to do so.

The following table shows the steps you must take to install programs on a terminal server, using Add or Remove Programs.

Task Comments
Ensure that no users are logged on to the terminal server. Send a message to all users who are logged on to the terminal server. Program installation often requires restarting the computer, and their sessions will be disconnected. You should not allow users to access the terminal server until programs have been installed and tested.
Disable Terminal Services connections temporarily. Right-click My Computer, click Properties, click the Remote tab, and then clear the Allow users to connect remotely to this computer check box.
Specify Full Security as the security mode. Open Terminal Services Configuration. In the console tree, click Server Settings, right-click Permission Compatibility, and then click Properties. In the Permission Compatibility dialog box, click Full Security, and then click OK.

Note

  • To open Terminal Services Connections, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Terminal Services Connections.
Install programs from a CD or floppy disk. Ensure that you are logged on as a member of the Administrators group on the terminal server. Open Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel, and then click Add New Programs. Click CD or Floppy. Insert the CD or floppy disk into the appropriate drive, and then click Next. Verify that the installation file is specified correctly in the Open box on the Run Installation Program page, and then click Finish. Follow the instructions in the program`s installation wizard. After the program is installed, edit and run any applicable scripts to tailor the program for a multisession environment.

Note

  • To open Add or Remove Programs, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
Test the installation.

Ensure that event logging is enabled by opening Services in Administrative Tools. Create a temporary user account that mimics the settings of the user or users who will access the program, and use the account to log on to the terminal server. Start the program and step through some basic tasks. Then, use Event Viewer to determine which files or directories need Write access and which registry keys require Read access by the user for correct operation. Note that this process might not find all files, directories, and registry keys for which the application requires access in all user scenarios. The only way to ensure that you have accounted for all access requirements is to perform tasks manually.

Some programs enable users to start other programs. For example, Microsoft Access has a toolbar that can be used to start other Microsoft Office programs. If you want users to have access only to specified programs when they log on to the terminal server, you should disable toolbar access from within programs that you install on the terminal server.

Note

  • To open Event Viewer, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Event Viewer.
Tune programs for multisession use. Use a text editor such as Notepad to modify any scripts, and then run the scripts to tune any programs that require it. To obtain the scripts, see Optimizing Applications for Windows 2000 Terminal Services and Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition at the Microsoft Web site.
Run application compatibility scripts. Navigate to the systemroot\Application Compatibility Scripts\Install directory on the terminal server and run scripts for any programs that require them.
Enable remote connections on the terminal server. Right-click My Computer, click Properties, click the Remote tab, and then check the Allow users to connect remotely to your computer check box.

Note

  • Depending on your desktop settings, My Computer might not appear on your desktop. To show or hide desktop icons, right-click somewhere on the desktop, click Properties, click the Desktop tab, click Customize Desktop, and then, under Desktop icons, select the check box next to the icon you want to display, or clear the check box next to the icon you want to hide.

Deploying client software

Remote Desktop Connection, formerly known as the Terminal Services Client, is installed automatically on computers running Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 operating systems. For performance and security reasons, computers running earlier versions of Microsoft Windows, including Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98, and Windows 95, should have the latest version of Remote Desktop Connection installed.

There are several ways to deploy the client software:

  • Share the Msrdpcli.msi file and use Microsoft IntelliMirror to distribute it to workstations running Windows 2000.
  • Download Remote Desktop Connection directly from the Microsoft Web site.
  • Place the .msi file in a shared folder residing on a server on the network.

This topic describes how to install the client software from a shared folder residing on a server on the network.

Before you deploy the client software, decide whether you want the software to be installed for the use of a single user or for anyone who uses the client computer. You will make this choice during the deployment process.

The following table shows the steps you must take to deploy the latest version of Remote Desktop Connection to clients running earlier versions of either Windows or Remote Desktop Connection.

Task Comments
Share the client setup folder. On the computer running a Windows Server 2003 operating system, open Windows Explorer. Navigate to the systemroot\System32\Clients\Tsclient\win32 folder, right-click the win32 folder, click Sharing and Security. On the Sharing tab, click Share this folder, and then click OK.

Note

  • To open Windows Explorer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer.
Install Remote Desktop Connection. On the client computer, click Start, click Run, and then, in Open, type \\ServerName\win32, where ServerName is the name of the computer where the shared folder is located. Double-click the msrdpcli.msi file to start the InstallShield Wizard for Remote Desktop Connection, and then click Next. Read the License Agreement, click I accept the terms in the license agreement, and then click Next. Type your name and organization in the Customer Information page, click Anyone who uses this computer (all users), and then click Next. On the Ready to Install the Program page, either click Back to review or change any of your installation settings, or click Install to begin the installation. To complete the installation, click Finish.

Giving users permission to access the terminal server

By default, on Windows Server 2003 operating systems, members of the Administrators and Remote Desktop Users groups can use Terminal Services connections to connect to a remote computer. The Remote Desktop Users group is not populated by default, so you must decide which users and groups should have permission to log on remotely, and then manually add them to this group.

Important

  • You must use the Remote Desktop Users group to grant selected users and groups the necessary permission to make Terminal Services connections to remote computers.
  • Membership in the Remote Desktop Users group does not also put the user into the local Users group. Depending on the contents of your local Users group, you might need to add the user to that group also.

Before you give users permission to access the terminal server, you must:

  • Check the membership of the Administrators group to ensure that you know who has access to the terminal server.
  • Decide which users should have permission to access the terminal server.
  • Determine which users must also be added to the local Users group.

The following table shows the steps you must take to give users permission to access the terminal server.

Task Comments
Add users to the Remote Desktop Users group. Open Computer Management (Local), and in the console tree, click Local Users and Groups. In the details pane, double-click the Groups folder, double-click Remote Desktop Users, and then click Add. In the Select Users dialog box, click Locations to specify the search location. To specify the types of objects that you want to search for, click Object Types. In this case, you want to search for Users or Groups. Type the name that you want to add in the Enter the object names to select (examples) box, and then click Check Names. When the name is located, click OK.

Note

  • To open Computer Management, click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.
Add users to the local Users group, if they are not already members. Open Computer Management (Local), and in the console tree, click Local Users and Groups. In the details pane, double-click the Groups folder, double-click Users, and then click Add. In the Select Users dialog box, click Locations to specify the search location. To specify the types of objects that you want to search for, click Object Types. In this case, you want to search for Users or Groups. Type the name that you want to add in the Enter the object names to select (examples) box, and then click Check Names. When the name is located, click OK.

Note

  • To open Computer Management, click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

Removing the terminal server role

If you need to reconfigure your server for a different role, you can remove existing server roles. If you remove the terminal server role, you will need to reinstall all software, review and update any file or registry permissions for which you changed default values, and review and update any software restriction policies that were used to control programs running on the terminal server.

To remove the terminal server role, restart the Configure Your Server Wizard by doing either of the following:

  • From Manage Your Server, click Add or remove a role. By default, Manage Your Server starts automatically when you log on. To open Manage Your Server, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Manage Your Server.
  • To open the Configure Your Server Wizard, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Configure Your Server Wizard.

On the Server Role page, click Terminal server, and then click Next. On the Role Removal Confirmation page, review the items listed under Summary, select the Remove the terminal server role check box, and then click Next. The following message appears: "During this process, the Configure Your Server Wizard restarts your computer. Before continuing, close any open programs." If you need to close open programs and you want to cancel the removal of the Terminal Server role at this time, you must click Cancel now. When you click Cancel, the Configure Your Server Wizard displays the Cannot Complete page. To close the Configure Your Server Wizard, click Finish. Otherwise, if you click OK, the Configure Your Server Wizard begins the removal process.

Next, the Configure Your Server Wizard displays the "Removing Terminal Server" message. The Configuring Components page of the Windows Components Wizard appears, displays messages about the configuration changes being made to the computer, and then closes. The Configure Your Server Wizard shuts down the computer and restarts it to accept the configuration changes that remove this role.

During the restart process, a dialog box displays progress messages, for example, "Windows is starting up" and "Preparing network connections." Depending on the size of your network, preparing network connections could take some time. When the Welcome to Windows dialog box appears, press CTRL+ALT+DEL. In the Log on to Windows dialog box, in Password, type your password. To complete the process, wait for the Configure Your Server Wizard to appear on the screen. On the Terminal Server Role Removed page, click Configure Your Server log to see a record of your changes, and then click Finish.

After you remove the terminal server role, you should:

  • Reinstall all software.
  • Review any file or registry permissions for which you changed default values and, if necessary, make changes.
  • Review any software restriction policies used to control programs running on the terminal server and, if necessary, make changes.

Next steps: Completing additional tasks

After you complete the Configure Your Server Wizard and associated tasks, the computer is ready for use as a basic terminal server that can accept multiple connections from remote clients. Up to this point, you have completed the following tasks:

  • Run the Configure Your Server Wizard.
  • Activated a Terminal Server License Server.
  • Installed CALs on the Terminal Server License Server.
  • Installed applications on the terminal server.
  • Deployed the Remote Desktop Connection .msi file to clients not running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 operating systems.
  • Configured user permissions for user access to the terminal server.

The following table lists some additional tasks you might want to perform on your terminal server.

Task Purpose of task Reference
Manage Terminal Services connections. To enable, disable, rename, or delete a connection. Manage Terminal Services connections
Specify connection permissions. To grant terminal server access only to selected users and groups.

To identify which users and groups are permitted to perform a given task or tasks on the terminal server.

Managing Terminal Services Users; Managing permissions on connections
Configure terminal server settings using either Group Policy or Terminal Services Configuration. To configure settings such as Active Desktop, temporary folders, and session limits for individual users. Configure server settings
Deploy Remote Desktop Web Connection. To allow users to create a Remote Desktop connection within Internet Explorer, even though the Remote Desktop Connection client is not installed on their computers. About Remote Desktop Web Connection
Control programs running in a terminal server session. To protect terminal servers and users from unknown, or possibly malicious, programs. Using Software Restriction Policies in Windows XP and the Windows Server 2003 family to Protect Against Unauthorized Software at the Microsoft Web site.
Configure Session Directory settings. To ensure that users are transparently reconnected to the original server hosting their disconnected Terminal Server sessions. This task applies to terminal servers that are part of a cluster of terminal servers, and requires that a server running either Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition, or a Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition, is visible on the network, and has the Session Directory service enabled. This session directory server should not be the server on which the Terminal Server role is configured.
What permissions do I need to install the Windows 2000 Server Terminal Services client on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP? 

This comes from Windows Magazine John Savill`s FAQ
http://www.winnetmag.com/windowsnt20002003faq/Article/ArticleID/40635/windowsnt20002003faq_40635.html
Windows 2003 and XP both ship with the Remote Desktop Connection software, which is the latest Terminal Services client. However, there might be times when you want to use a previous version of the client. To be able to install previous versions of the client, you must be a local administrator or have Write and Modify permissions on the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSLicensing\Store\MSLicensing registry value.

How do I install Office 2003 on Windows Terminal Services? 

See the Microsoft Page:
http://www.microsoft.com/office/ork/2003/two/ch5/DepD06.htm
Which States:
Unlike with previous versions of Microsoft® Office, installing Microsoft Office 2003 to a Terminal Services–enabled computer is not much different than installing Office to a non-Terminal Services–enabled computer. Before installing Office in this environment, however, the administrator needs to perform some tasks relating to how Terminal Services was installed. Installing Office 2003 on a Terminal Services–enabled computer Before you install Office to a computer that is enabled with Terminal Services, it is very important that you check to make sure that specific operating modes of Terminal Services were enabled when Terminal Services Setup was run, including the following: The installation of Terminal Services must have been installed to use Application Server mode. Terminal Services must be enabled and running on the server before installation of Office 2003 begins. For Microsoft Windows® 2000 servers, Windows 2000 compatibility mode should be selected to retain a locked-down installation. Once you have checked for these modes, you are ready to install Office 2003. To install Office 2003 on a Terminal Services–enabled server Open Control Panel. Run the Add/Remove Programs utility. Click Add New Programs (left-hand pane). Click CD or Floppy. Insert the Office 2003 CD into the CD-ROM drive, and then click Next. If needed, browse for the Office 2003 Setup program (Setup.exe) and select it, then click OK. – or – If you are installing from an administrative installation point, browse to that location, select setup.exe, and then click OK. In the resulting Run Installation Programs dialog, add any command-line customizations you require (unless already specified in the Setup settings file (Setup.ini) stored in the administrative installation point). Click Finish. Customizing Office 2003 for a Terminal Services installation Customizing Office 2003 for a Terminal Services–enabled installation is possible, but you need to first understand the differences between how Office runs with a Terminal Services–enabled operating system versus one that is not enabled as such. By default, almost all features in Office 2003 are enabled and installed as part of the installation. This helps reduce the number of subsequent application or feature installations an administrator might need to perform for users. Because Office, by default, is installed in a locked-down configuration, users cannot perform installations (like adding a feature), because they cannot write to the registry or application and system folders. Therefore, it is recommended to install all the applications and available features to minimize the need for further installations by the administrator. As part of an installation to a Terminal Services–enabled system, some specific features are disabled by default because of their high bandwidth requirements for network and dial-up users. For instance, animations, sounds, and high-resolution graphics are disabled; or, in the case of high-resolution graphics, substituted with lower-resolution graphics. To determine which settings are enabled or disabled, you can attempt to install Office to a properly configured Terminal Services–enabled server and examine the feature installation options during the installation. This will give you a baseline of what features are installed. Then, if you need to install many Terminal Services–enabled systems, you can create a transform using the Custom Installation Wizard and set the appropriate settings you want to use.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note Any features you set to Install on Demand will be ignored and installed as Run from My Computer. Also, by default, installations to Terminal Services–enabled systems will always install the low-resolution graphics for splash screens.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Though you can create a transform for use with deployment of Office 2003, the majority of settings configured for installation are by default optimized for a Terminal Services-enabled system. Also, since most installations of this type are performed in a server farm or within a controlled environment, the creation and use of transforms is not as necessary as with distributed-client system scenarios. When creating transforms for use with Terminal Services-enabled systems, it is highly recommended that you not enable features that are disabled or set to Not Available. If you expect to deploy Office 2003 to more than two or three Terminal Services-enabled systems, creating a transform is worthwhile, especially if there are several customizations. See the Customizing Office 2003 section for more information about creating transforms for use with Office. The Below comes from Microsoft Knowledge base at:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;828955

How to Install Office 2003 on a Computer That Is Running Windows Terminal Server

View products that this article applies to.

SUMMARY

This step-by-step article describes how to install Microsoft Office 2003 on either of the following computers:
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003-based computer with Terminal Services enabled.
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server-based computer with Terminal Services enabled.
Before you install Office 2003 to the Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services computer, the computer must be configured as follows:
  • Terminal Services is installed and enabled.
  • Terminal Services is configured for application server mode for multiple terminal server clients to run Office 2003.


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How to Install Office 2003 on a Computer That Is Running Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 with Terminal Services Enabled

To install Office 2003 on a computer that is running Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 Server with Terminal Services enabled, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs, click Add New Programs, and then click CD or Floppy.
  3. Click Next.
  4. Click Browse.
  5. Locate the root folder of the Office 2003 source location, click Setup.exe, and then click Open.

    Setup.exe is added to the command line that appears in the Open box of the Run Installation Program dialog box.
  6. Click Finish to run Office 2003 Setup.
  7. If requested, type your customer name and product key (CD key) information in the appropriate boxes, and then click Next.

    Note The Next button is not available until you type a valid product key.
  8. Accept the End User License Agreement, and then click Next.
  9. Specify the location where you want to install Office 2003, and then click Next.
  10. On the Choose which applications for setup to install page, click Next.

    If you click Choose detailed installation options for each application on the Choose which applications for setup to install page, and then click Next, the feature tree appears on the Choose installation options for all Office applications and tools page. Because Office Setup detects that you are using Terminal Services, the only installation states that are available are Not Available and Run from My Computer. By default, some features are set to Not Available. Do not change the installation states of these features to Run from My Computer, because you may experience problems with the Office 2003 programs that use these features.

    Warning By default, some features are set to Not Available to make sure that there is optimum performance in a Terminal Server environment, including the elimination of unexpected errors. Do not change the installation states of these features to Run from My Computer.

    Note If your Office 2003 source location is an administrative installation, Run from Network is also displayed as an installation state.
  11. On the Begin installation page, click Install.
  12. When you receive a message that the installation completed successfully, click OK, click Next, and then click Finish.
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REFERENCES

For more information about how to install and configure Terminal Services, see your Microsoft Windows 2000 documentation and Microsoft Windows 2000 online Help.

For more information about the installation and customization of Office 2003 on Terminal Services, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/office/ork/2003/two/ch5/DepD06.htm

For more information about how to install Office 2003 on a computer that is running Terminal Services, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/proddocs/entserver/terminal_server_role.asp

For more information about how to deploy Office 2003, see the Microsoft Office Resource Kit. To do so, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/office/ork/2003/two/default.htm

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The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Office 2003, All Editions, when used with:
      Microsoft Windows XP 64-Bit Edition Version 2003
      Microsoft Windows Server 2003, 64-Bit Enterprise Edition
      Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
      Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
      Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
      Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
      Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
What is the Terminal Services License viewer tool? 

Terminal Services License Server Viewer (LSView) is a GUI tool that displays information about all available Terminal Services license servers in the current domain and current site of the computer. It is useful for monitoring and logging the status of license servers.
You can download it from the Microsoft site here.

How do I set up the Remote Command Service from the Windows 2000 Resource Kit. 
Credit Elias Knaser from his article in the October 2003 Windows .Net magazine for this one:
To install and use the tool, install a copy of the resource kit on your machine. By default, the resource kit installs in \%systemroot%\Program Files\Resource Kit and stores the Remote Command Service files in a subdirectory named RCMD. The directory will contain two files: rcmd.exe, the file you use to launch the command-line client (you can copy and use this client on any machine from which you want to initiate commands), and rcmdsvc.exe, the server component that you install on every server or workstation you want to run remote commands on. The rcmd.exe file creates a command session, or "virtual console," whenever a client connects to the server. You can simultaneously connect as many as 10 clients to the remote command server on a computer, and all the clients operate securely and independently of one another.

To install rcmdsvc.exe, log on as an administrator to the XP, Win2K, or Windows NT 4.0 machine you want to run remote commands on, copy the file into \%systemroot%winnt\system32, and type

rcmdsvc -install

at the command prompt. To start the service, type

net start rcmdsvc

You can now copy the rcmd.exe file to any location and start using it. Open a command prompt, and browse to the directory in which you saved the rcmd.exe file. Enter the Rcmd command. The Help files specify the Rcmd command parameters as

rcmd [server_name [command] ]

Although these parameters aren`t difficult to understand, they don`t follow the traditional format conventions that Microsoft uses for command strings. Here`s a simpler and easier format that you can use:

rcmd \\<servername> <command>

where servername is the name of the server you want to remotely execute a command on and command is the tool or utility you want to run on that server to execute a particular task. This command opens a command-line session with the specified server. Or, you can simply type

rcmd

at the command prompt, in which case you`ll be prompted to enter a server name. Exit this mode by typing

exit

or by pressing Ctrl+Break.

What is Hyperthreading? 

This response comes from Intel page at: http://www.intel.com/technology/hyperthread/
Hyper-Threading Technology is a groundbreaking innovation from Intel® Corporation that enables multi-threaded software applications to execute threads in parallel. This level of threading technology has never been seen before in a general-purpose microprocessor. Internet, e-Business, and enterprise software applications continue to put higher demands on processors. To improve performance in the past, threading was enabled in the software by splitting instructions into multiple streams so that multiple processors could act upon them. Today with Hyper-Threading Technology, processor-level threading can be utilized which offers more efficient use of processor resources for greater parallelism and improved performance on today`s multi-threaded software. Hyper-Threading Technology provides thread-level-parallelism (TLP) on each processor resulting in increased utilization of processor execution resources. As a result, resource utilization yields higher processing throughput. Hyper-Threading Technology is a form of simultaneous multi-threading technology (SMT) where multiple threads of software applications can be run simultaneously on one processor. This is achieved by duplicating the architectural state on each processor, while sharing one set of processor execution resources. Hyper-Threading Technology also delivers faster response times for multi-tasking workload environments. By allowing the processor to use on-die resources that would otherwise have been idle, Hyper-Threading Technology provides a performance boost on multi-threading and multi-tasking operations for the Intel® NetBurst™ microarchitecture.
This technology is largely invisible to the platform. In fact, many applications are already multi-threaded and will automatically benefit from this technology. However, multi-threaded applications take full advantage of the increased performance that Hyper-Threading Technology has to offer, allowing users will see immediate performance gains when multitasking. Today`s multi-processing aware software is also compatible with Hyper-Threading Technology enabled platforms, but further performance gains can be realized by specifically tuning software for Hyper-Threading Technology. This technology complements traditional multi-processing by providing additional headroom for future software optimizations and business growth.
Hyper-Threading Technology offers many benefits to e-Business and the enterprise such as:
Enables more user support improving business productivity
Provides faster response times for Internet and e-Business applications enhancing customer experience
Increases number of transactions that can be processed
Allows compatibility with existing IA-32 applications and operating systems
Handles larger workloads
Offers headroom for future business growth and new solution capabilities

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